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Instructions for Conducting a Remote Viewing Experiment Spring 1985
 
by Jack Houck
 
1. Introduction
 
The basic protocol for conducting remote-viewing experiments was established in the early 1970s by Dr. Harold Puthoff of Stanford Research Institute (SRI) International, and Russell Targ of Delphi Associates (Reference 1). In the early 1980s, Dr. Robert G. Jahn and Brenda J. Dunne of Princeton University developed a computerized judging procedure which simplified remote-viewing experiments and seemed to produce more statistically significant results (Reference 2). In 1984, Lt. Aaron Curtis of the Air Force converted the Princeton computer's judging program to one that could be used with the Apple personal computer, making this procedure readily available to the general public (Reference 3).
 
These instructions incorporate the computerized judging procedures and will allow anyone to carry out a remote-viewing experiment. The functions of the target selector, the outbound experimenter, the remote viewer, and the interviewer are discussed in this paper.
 
2. The Target Selector
 
A pool of targets must be developed. The person selecting these must be someone who is not otherwise involved with the experiment. Each of the targets should be within one-half hour's driving time from the location of the remote viewer during an experiment trial. The person choosing the targets must read and answer the 30 questions (Appendix A) for each target used in the computer analysis. He must answer all the questions by checking the appropriate "Yes" or "No" columns, and add any qualifying comments on the Remote Viewing Answer form (Appendix B) to select target locations and scenes that are compatible with the questions. As each target scene is selected and used, it must be replaced with another target scene so that the number of scenes in the target pool remains constant. For the purposes of this description, assume that there will be six remote-viewing experiment trials and the target pool contains ten possible targets at all times. This means that a total of 16 targets must be designated by the target selector.
 
The target selector must also specify the exact location at which the outbound experimenter is to position himself at the target scene. Because he is a "beacon" for the mind of the remote viewer, the outbound experimenter should be as close to the intended target as possible, and should not move around during the 15-minute period when the remote viewer is attempting to perceive information about the target location.
 
The target selector should fill out an index card for each target, containing the target's location and the position that the outbound experimenter is to take at the scene. He should seal the index card with his answers to the 30 questions, as he perceives them, in a plain
*** This paper was published in ARTIFEX, Vol. 4, No. 1, Spring 1985
white envelope for each target. All 16 envelopes containing target information are then given to the outbound experimenter.
 
3. The Outbound Experimenter
 
The outbound experimenter should be someone who is known to the remote viewer, even if they are only briefly acquainted. The outbound experimenter must have transportation and must know how to work a hand calculator that is capable of selecting a random number from 1 to 10. Once the outbound experimenter has received the target set (i.e., the 16 envelopes) from the target selector, he selects ten of the envelopes to form the initial target pool. He then numbers the envelopes from 1 to 10. The target pool is to be stored in the outbound experimenter's car, or some other place, where neither the remote viewer nor the interviewer has access to it.
 
On the day of an experiment trial, the outbound experimenter, the interviewer, and the remote viewer are to meet at a predesignated location from which the remote viewing is to be done. Exactly one-half hour before the remote viewing is to begin, the outbound experimenter leaves that location. Then, using the hand calculator, he obtains a random number from 1 to 10 and removes the envelope displaying the selected number from the target pool of 10 envelopes. He opens the envelope, reads the card, and proceeds to the vicinity of the target. He should approach the location specified at the exact time when the remote viewing is scheduled to begin.
 
The outbound experimenter must stay at the target location for 15 minutes. He should try to generate a peak emotional event during this time period in order to attract the mind of the remote viewer to that location. The best type of emotion is not known. To date, the evidence suggests that it does not matter.
 
He should review the answers to the 30 questions and, if necessary, change them to make them more exact. This information will be used by the computer as the actual target specification. It is also helpful if the outbound experimenter can take photographs of the target scene and in all directions around the target. However, most of his attention should be kept on the target scene during this 15-minute period.
 
After the 15 minutes are up, when he has reviewed and completed the answers to the questions and taken pictures, the outbound experimenter should go to the nearest telephone (in a coffee shop, a gas station, etc.) and call the interviewer. The outbound experimenter should indicate the location of the telephone, but should not provide any information about the actual target. The interviewer and the remote viewer will then meet the outbound experimenter at the telephone location. The outbound experimenter will then give the interviewer the data he has collected, which the interviewer will date and store with the data he has received from the remote viewer about the target site. (This procedure will guard against inadvertent adjustments being made to the data.)
 
They proceed to the target for feedback so that the remote viewer will see the correct target characteristics. As a result, that target image will not interfere in future experimental trials.
 
At the target site, it is again desirable for everyone to display the appropriate emotions. Since the experimenters cannot be sure whether the data has come from the actual viewing time or whether the remote viewer's mind "slid ahead" and obtained it during the feedback period, it is very important that the experimenters attempt to create another peak emotional event at the target during this period. This will mark the end of a given experimental trial.
 
The outbound experimenter then takes one of the remaining envelopes that was not selected for the target pool to replace the one used during the experimental trial just completed. It should be given the same number as the one just used so that the target pool will once again contain ten envelopes marked 1 to 10.
 
This procedure is repeated for each experimental trial. It is desirable to wait one or two days between trials to prevent target Òbleed through.Ó
 
4. The Remote Viewer
 
The remote viewer can be anyone who is willing to believe that being able to perceive information at a remote location is possible. The interviewer and the remote viewer are a team whose intention is to gather information about the target that the outbound experimenter is observing. The remote viewer's function is to let his mind go to the target site and bring back the information without analyzing it.
 
Between the time the outbound experimenter leaves and the remote viewing begins (which could be established as one-half hour), the remote viewer should relax and get into a meditative state. When the remote viewing begins, the remote viewer simply follows the interviewer's instructions and reports the information that comes to mind. He usually responds verbally first, then makes drawings of what he has observed. Because the data can come through all sensory channels, the remote viewer should report any changes he experiences in his sense perceptions. The initial free-response period lasts 15 minutes, during which time the interviewer asks questions and possibly makes suggestions (e.g., sit on top of the building you just discribed.).
 
After the free-response period and the completion of the drawings, the interviewer will ask the remote viewer each of the 30 questions (Appendix A) for the judging procedure. The remote viewer must answer yes or no to all the questions, even if some questions do not seem relevant. During this question-and-answer period, the remote viewer should also keep track of and report any additional information perceived in the "Comments" column of the answer form (Appendix B) and on supplementary paper, if required.
 
5. The Interviewer
 
The interviewer's job in a remote-viewing experiment seems the easiest, but the skill of the interviewer may directly influence the experimental results. The interviewer must coordinate the overall procedure: He establishes the time when the remote viewing will begin; records the remote viewer's impressions during the free-response period using a tape recorder; and provides black pen and paper so that the remote viewer can draw. The interviewer is also responsible for locating the remote viewer in a quiet, undisturbed place with a minimum of visual distractions.
 
During the free-response period, the interviewer must first request the information from the viewer, who has been relaxing and attempting to get into a meditative state. His request might be: "I would like you to send your mind out to locate Gertrude, and tell me your impressions about what you feel at this time." When the remote viewer's responses make the interviewer feel that the viewer is getting information from the target area, he can ask the viewer to draw what he is perceiving, and should give him adequate time to make these drawings.
 
The interviewer must interpret what the remote viewer is saying, analyze it, and ask the viewer specific questions to elicit more details about the target scene, without leading the viewer. He should also try to keep the viewer from analyzing the data before reporting it. Since the viewer is extremely mobile at the target, questions such as "What do you see when you are looking down at the target?" are useful. It is recommended, however, that the interviewer ask the viewer to be his normal size; this will prevent distortions in the drawings caused by changes in size and scale. He must also specify that the viewer be at the target at the current time.
 
After the free-response period, the interviewer should ask the viewer the 30 questions without rushing the answers and comments. All the materials should then be signed by both participants and dated.
 
Upon receiving the phone call from the outbound experimenter, the interviewer and the remote viewer drive to the specified location to meet the outbound experimenter. They proceed to the target site together for feedback.
 
6. Data Analysis
 
The audio tapes made during each of the experiment trials should be transcribed for use in the documentation of the experiment. Both the answers to the 30 questions noted down by the outbound experimenter and those prepared by the remote viewer are input to the Apple computer program for judging. The program determines the statistical significance of the experiment.* In the computer program, there are two useful methods of analysis: analysis by direct comparison, and analysis weighted by typical responses based on Princeton data (Reference 2). The computer program also allows for the use of smaller groupings of the experiment trials to determine the contribution of each trial to the experimental results.
 
After the quantitative analysis, the experiment should be documented, using all the available data. Much can be learned from each experiment, and better results can be expected as proficiency is achieved in conducting these simple remote-viewing experiments.
*The single-tailed p-value is the parameter of interest. If p< = .05, then the experiment is considered to have been successful.
 
7. References
 
1. Puthoff, Harold E., and Russell Targ, "Standard Remote-Viewing Protocol (Local Targets)," Stanford Research Institute (SRI) International Report (November 1978).
 
2. Jahn, R. G., B. J. Dunne, et al, "Analytical Judging Procedure for Remote Perception Experiments - II: Ternary Coding and Generalized Descriptors," Princeton University, School of Engineering/Applied Science (August 1982).
 
3. Curtis, Aaron, "Remote Perception and Data Analysis Computer Program Documentation (AugusÓt 1984). (Available from Jack Houck, 5821 Woodboro Dr., Huntington Beach, CA 92649.)
 
4. Houck, G. B. (Jack), "Conceptual Model of Paranormal Phenomena," ARC ARCHAEUS 1, 1 (Winter 1983).

Appendix A - DESCRIPTOR QUERIES
(Developed by Dr. Robert Jahn and Brenda Dunn)
 
1. Is any significant part of the perceived scene indoors?
 
2. Is the scene predominantly dark; e.g., poorly lighted indoors, nighttime outside, etc. (not simply dark colors, etc.)?
 
3. Does any significant part of the scene involve perception of height or depth; e.g., looking up at a tower, tall building, mountain, vaulted ceiling, unusually tall trees, etc., or down into a valley, or down from any elevated position?
 
4. From the agent's perspective, is the scene well‑bounded; e.g., interior of a room, a stadium, a courtyard, etc.?
 
5. Is any significant part of the scene oppressively confined?
 
6. Is any significant part of the scene hectic, chaotic, congested or cluttered?
 
7. Is the scene predominantly colorful, characterized by a profusion of color, or are there outstanding brightly colored objects prominent; e.g., flowers, stained‑glass windows, etc. (not normally blue sky, green grass, usual building colors, etc.)?
 
8. Are any signs, billboards, posters or pictorial representations prominent in the scene?
 
9. Is there any significant movement or motion integral to the scene; e.g., a stream of moving vehicles, walking or running people, blowing objects, etc.?
 
10. Is there any explicit and significant sound; e.g., auto horn, voices, bird calls, surf noises, etc.?
 
11. Are any people or figures of people significant in the scene, other than the agent or those implicit in buildings, vehicles, etc.?
 
12. Are any animals, birds, major insects or figures of these significant in the scene?
 
13. Does a single major object or structure dominate the scene?
 
14. Is the central focus of the scene predominantly natural, i.e., not man‑made?
 
15. Is the immediately surrounding environment of the scene predominantly natural, i.e., not man‑made?
 
16. Are any monuments, sculptures or major ornaments prominent?
 
17. Are explicit geometric shapes; e.g., triangles, circles or portions of circles (such as arcs), spheres or portions of spheres, etc. (but excluding normal rectangular buildings, doors, windows, etc.) significant in the scene?
 
18. Are there any posts, poles or similar thin objects; e.g., columns, lampposts, smokestacks, etc. (excluding trees)?
 
19. Are doors, gates or entrances significant in the scene (excluding vehicles)?
 
20. Are windows or glass significant in the scene (excluding vehicles)?
 
21. Are any fences, gates, railings, dividers or scaffolding prominent in the scene?
 
22. Are steps or stairs prominent (excluding curbs)?
 
23. Is there regular repetition of some object or shape; e.g., parking lot full of cars, marina with boats, a row of arches, etc.?
 
24. Are there any planes, boats or trains, or figures thereof apparent in the scene?
 
25. Is there any other major equipment in the scene; e.g., tractors, carts, gasoline pumps, etc.?
 
26. Are there any autos, buses, trucks, bikes or motorcycles, or figures thereof prominent in the scene (excluding agent's car)?
 
27. Does grass, moss or similar ground cover compose a significant portion of the surface?
 
28. Does any central part of the scene contain a road, street, path, bridge, tunnel, railroad tracks or hallway?
 
29. Is water a significant part of the scene?
 
30. Are trees, bushes or major potted plants apparent in the scene?

Appendix B

Remote Viewing Questionnaire Date of Viewing ________________

Name: ____________________________________ Target Site #: _____________

Street: ________________________________________________________________

City: ________________________________State: ___________ Zip: ___________

 

Draw the major features of the picture on the back of this paper, then check yes or no for ALL questions.

 
  Descriptor
Yes
No
Comments
1. Indoors --------------------------------------
___
___
___________________
2. Dark -----------------------------------------
___
___
___________________
3. Height ---------------------------------------
___
___
___________________
4. Bounded -------------------------------------
___
___
___________________
5. Confined -------------------------------------
___
___
___________________
6. Hectic ---------------------------------------
___
___
___________________
7. Colorful --------------------------------------
___
___
___________________
8. Signs ----------------------------------------
___
___
___________________
9. Motion ---------------------------------------
___
___
___________________
10. Sound ---------------------------------------
___
___
___________________
11. People ---------------------------------------
___
___
___________________
12. Animals --------------------------------------
___
___
___________________
13. Single Object --------------------------------
___
___
___________________
14. Natural Focus --------------------------------
___
___
___________________
15. Surroundings Natural --------------------------
___
___
___________________
16. Monuments ----------------------------------
___
___
___________________
17. Geometric Shapes ----------------------------
___
___
___________________
18. Poles ----------------------------------------
___
___
___________________
19. Doors ----------------------------------------
___
___
___________________
20. Windows -------------------------------------
___
___
___________________
21. Fences / Scaffolding --------------------------
___
___
___________________
22. Steps / Stairs --------------------------------
___
___
___________________
23. Repetition ------------------------------------
___
___
___________________
24. Planes / Boats / Trains -----------------------
___
___
___________________
25. Major Equipment -----------------------------
___
___
___________________
26. Vehicles -------------------------------------
___
___
___________________
27. Grass / Moss ---------------------------------
___
___
___________________
28. Roads / Bridges / Tracks ----------------------
___
___
___________________
29. Water ----------------------------------------
___
___
___________________
30. Trees / Bushes -------------------------------
___
___
___________________

When complete, look at feedback envelope. Compare your answers to the answer sheet in the envelope. How many answers are the same? Turn in this paper. Put envelopes back together. Put them in Jack's briefcase.



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